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Loch Ness

Loch Ness (1996) Movie Poster
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  •  UK / USA  •    •  101m  •    •  Directed by: John Henderson.  •  Starring: Ted Danson, Joely Richardson, Ian Holm, Harris Yulin, James Frain, Keith Allen, Nick Brimble, Kirsty Graham, Harry Jones, Philip O'Brien, Joseph Greig, John Dair, John Verea.  •  Music by: Trevor Jones.
        Young Mac Campbell is forced to go on a working vacation with his father to retrieve some lost machinery in a remote lake in British Columbia. Initially disappointed that he's not going to Disney World, Mac becomes fascinated with the lake's legendary monster, known as the Ogopogo. Mac's bond with the lovable lake creature becomes the catalyst in forging a deeper understanding between father and son.

Trailers:

   Length:  Languages:  Subtitles:
 2:09
 
 

Review:

Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
Image from: Loch Ness (1996)
To those who have not seen this movie: I am going to give you a fair warning. If you are looking for a creature feature, if you are looking for a monster movie, if you are looking for the cheap thrills that are stereotypically imagined coming from a movie with a title such as "Loch Ness", you are not going to get any of these. If who want to see the Loch Ness monster plucking people from docks and boats and gorging on them, don't even bother to start, because "Loch Ness" isn't even remotely along those lines. This is not a low-budget horror movie.

By contrast, this is a pleasantly sweet, low-key, lighthearted movie magic family's entertainment best suited for audience members between the ages of six and thirteen and with some appeal to limited members of the older generation. As an adult, I enjoyed this delightful, if somewhat flimsy, little independent film.

"Loch Ness" is, to a certain extent, not even about the Loch Ness monster. It's really more of a docudrama about the loch itself and the legend of the prehistoric creatures that supposedly dwells beneath its murky surface. The movie stars Ted Danson as a discredited American scientist who has come to Scotland to not find the monster, but, to quote his boss "use the latest technology to prove it's a hoax." Danson himself doesn't believe in the monster even though he's made a name for himself chasing Sasquatch in the Pacific Northwest. While in Scotland, he picks up a research assistant (James Frain) and forms a friendship with the local pub owner (Joely Richardson) and her ubiquitous daughter (Kirsty Graham) who seems to know a little more about the loch than anybody else does.

"Loch Ness" is, all in all, a family movie. There is some peril in the movie, but not enough to terrify the younger audience members. It's got the same spirit as "Free Willy" (1993) if "Free Willy" was set on a lake and the whale merely speculated to be there. Again, if you're a monster movie fanatic, stray away, for the attacks and blood and gore and shiny teeth you seek will not be found. The movie really boasts the question many people have: does the monster even exist? And that is the attitude of the picture. If it were a serious monster movie, we'd know right from the start. But it keeps that question going and going and for that reason, I enjoyed it, for it wasn't just another monster tale, because I personally have seen that movie over and over again, such as in another Loch Ness monster tale called "Beyond Loch Ness" in which the creature was revealed to be real after only five minutes of speculation.

Performances are quite good. Ted Danson is effective as the troubled, doubtful scientist who feels that he's just driving another nail into his credibility's coffin. James Frain is also good, although he does at times overplay his character, but it is refreshing to see the mentor-student relationship between him and Danson whereas it typically would be a tag team. I also liked Joely Richardson and was especially fond of Kirsty Graham as the mysterious little girl with a secret. And the screen is also aided by the presence of veteran actor Ian Holm as a water bailiff who always seems to watching Danson with a suspicious eye.

"Loch Ness" doesn't reach its full potential because of a somewhat flimsy screenplay, with some scenes ending before we hardly even realize they've started. Some of the dialogue is rather poor, some supporting characters just time-wasters, and such, but all in all, it's a simply fine family movie although it will not ring the bells for everybody. I liked it for its sense of wonder and mystery about the loch where this creature maymay not exist (the movie plays that note), I liked it for the performances, I liked it for the beautiful, ear-warming music score by Trevor Jones, the crystal clear cinematography by Clive Tickner, the unique and seldom-explored nature of the ending, and just an overall enthusiastic tone that director John Henderson instilled into this delightful, if flawed family movie.


Review by TheUnknown837-1 from the Internet Movie Database.