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World Without End

World Without End (1956) Movie Poster
USA  •    •  80m  •    •  Directed by: Edward Bernds.  •  Starring: Hugh Marlowe, Nancy Gates, Nelson Leigh, Rod Taylor, Shirley Patterson, Lisa Montell, Christopher Dark, Booth Colman, Everett Glass, Stanley Fraser, David Alpert, John Bleifer, Paul Brinegar.  •  Music by: Leith Stevens.
        Four astronauts returning from mankind's first mission to Mars enter a time warp and crash on a 26th Century Earth devastated by atomic war. Our heroes meet with hideous mutant cavemen, giant spiders, love-struck beauties in short dresses, and jealous old geezers in sparkly skullcaps as they struggle to save humanity and build a new world.

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Review:

Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Image from: World Without End (1956)
Although "World Without End" (1956) is not that terrific of a movie, I value it as one of a fairly small number of 50s sci-fi movies that are filmed in good-looking color, have good acting and show imagination in production design and story. I'm thinking of movies like "When Worlds Collide" (1951), "This Island Earth" (1955), "Invaders from Mars" (1953), "Gog" (1954), "Forbidden Planet" (1956), "4D Man" (1959), "Flight to Mars" (1951), "The Blob" (1958), "Conquest of Space" (1955), "Destination Moon" (1950), and "Riders to the Stars" (1954).

"World Without End" has a crew of four in a spaceship that has circumnavigated Mars and starts back to Earth, when it encounters a time displacement. The spaceship ends up in the year 2508 on an Earth that has been recovering from a nuclear Armageddon for a long time. On the surface are savage mutants mostly, and in caves are a civilized but defensive people that's dying out, even though it has maintained an advanced technology. In the crew are Hugh Marlowe and Rod Taylor, who would 4 years later win the lead in "The Time Machine". Fans might also recognize a good many of the other competent players, such as Nancy Gates, Christopher Dark, Nelson Leigh, and Booth Colman.

Their landing place in the Rockies is simulated by the Iverson Ranch, a favorite location for shooting westerns, and this external part of the movie shares some western feel as the explorers encounter mutant savages. The cave locations are colorful and modernistic sets with geometric patterns, beauteous females and less than robust men who all wear tight-fitting skull caps. The drama mainly involves the crew's attempts to motivate the cave-dwellers to take back the surface. This is tied in with a couple of triangular love conflicts and a power struggle on the ruling council.

It's pretty mild stuff. It's not big-budget. The effects are low-tech 50s. The focus is on the personal side of coping with a new situation in which the crew may never see family and friends again and in which persist the drives that led these men to be explorers on a dangerous task. In their philosophy, life must go on beyond living in a hole in the ground and the world must go on without end. They find more support from the underground females than the males. The females want robust babies andor what produces them; the men's testosterone seems to be waning. The story drives this movie, put across by a capable cast.

If you are attracted to 50s sci-fi movies, you will want to see this one even though it is not at the top of the heap even of those in its subset.


Review by msroz from the Internet Movie Database.