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Return from Witch Mountain

Return from Witch Mountain (1978) Movie Poster
  •  USA  •    •  95m  •    •  Directed by: John Hough.  •  Starring: Bette Davis, Christopher Lee, Kim Richards, Ike Eisenmann, Jack Soo, Anthony James, Richard Bakalyan, Ward Costello, Christian Juttner, Brad Savage, Poindexter Yothers, Jeffrey Jacquet, Stu Gilliam.  •  Music by: Lalo Schifrin.
       Tia and her brother Tony have supernatural powers, can communicate and move things with the power of their mind alone. They arrive on Earth for a visit in Los Angeles. When Tony uses his powers to prevent an accident, he gets into the hands of Dr. Gannon, a ruthless scientist who's constantly striving for power over the world. He puts him a device into the brain that allows him to control Tony's will. Tia gets help from a kids gang to free Tony and save the Earth.

Trailers:

   Length:  Languages:  Subtitles:
 1:48
 

Review:

Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
Image from: Return from Witch Mountain (1978)
"Escape to Witch Mountain" is not a perfect movie, but has a good plot, well-developed characters, and beautiful scenery. "Return from Witch Mountain", unfortunately, has none of those. In this contrived sequel, Tony and Tia are left to fend for themselves while on vacation in Los Angeles (all the better to save on the budget!), where they become mixed up with a mad scientist (Christopher Lee), his partner (Bette Davis), and various other Disney stock characters. What charms the original had are completely absent from this sequel, which seems to borrow every cliché from the scores of middling-to-bad Disney movies which littered the movie landscape in the 1970s.

Much of the dialog is cringe-worthy; you'll actually be embarrassed watching it.


Review by S Bradford from the Internet Movie Database.