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Shape of Things to Come, The

Shape of Things to Come, The (1979) Movie Poster
  •  Canada  •    •  98m  •    •  Directed by: George McCowan.  •  Starring: Jack Palance, Carol Lynley, Barry Morse, John Ireland, Nicholas Campbell, Anne-Marie Martin, Greg Swanson, Mark Parr, William Hutt, Ardon Bess, Lynda Mason Green, Albert Humphries, Bill Lake.  •  Music by: Paul Hoffert.
        Planet Earth is a devastated wasteland, and what's left of humanity has colonized the Moon in domed cities. Humanity's continued survival depends on an anti-radiation drug only available on planet Delta Three, which has been taken over by Omus, a brilliant but mad mechanic who places no value on human life. Omus wants to come to the Moon to rule and intends to attack it by ramming robot-controlled spaceships into the domes. Dr. John Caball, his son Jason, Jason's friend, Kim, and a robot named Sparks embark on Caball's space battlecruiser on an unauthorized mission to Delta Three to stop Omus.

Trailers:

   Length:  Languages:  Subtitles:
 1:53
 
 
 0:31
 
 

Review:

Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
Image from: Shape of Things to Come, The (1979)
"The Shape of Things to Come" is the second screen adaptation of the H.G. Welles story, after the 1936 film "Things to Come". It stars a few veterans (Jack Palance, John Ireland, Barry Morse, Carol Lynley) and two Canadians who were then up-and-comers: Nicholas Campbell ('Da Vinci's Inquest') and Anne-Marie Martin ("Prom Night" 1980). Bright young Jason (Campbell) and his scientist father (Morse) venture into space with Kim (Martin), the daughter of a senator (Ireland), in a future setting where robot wars have decimated Planet Earth and humans live in colonies on the moon. Their self-appointed mission is to throw a monkey wrench into the plans of nefarious villain Omus (Palance), a power hungry would-be dictator who once studied under Morse.

This one does seem to be mostly disliked, and the reason why is clear early on. This was obviously done on a limited budget, and the filmmaking (direction by Canadian born George McCowan, "Frogs") definitely lacks distinction. This is admittedly minor league fare with low grade effects, and is an unmemorable adaptation of the story, but this viewer found it impossible to actively hate it. It's all appealing enough, ultra cheap effects and all. Even the robot characters, as extremely clunky looking as they are, are endearing in a hearkening- back-to-sci fi-B-pictures-of-the-50s sort of way. The main robot character "Sparks", voiced by Greg Swanson and performed by Mark Parr, is endearing.

Palance and Ireland are just picking up paychecks here. Both Lynley and Martin are simply gorgeous. Martin and Campbell are very sincere and likable. Morse has more to work with than his other veteran co-stars and gives the best performance in the movie.

If you're a die hard science fiction buff, you may want to see it for completions' sake.


Review by Scott LeBrun from the Internet Movie Database.

 

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