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Honey I Blew Up the Kid

Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992) Movie Poster
  •  USA  •    •  89m  •    •  Directed by: Randal Kleiser.  •  Starring: Rick Moranis, Marcia Strassman, Robert Oliveri, Daniel Shalikar, Joshua Shalikar, Lloyd Bridges, John Shea, Keri Russell, Ron Canada, Amy O'Neill, Michael Milhoan, Gregory Sierra, Leslie Neale.  •  Music by: Bruce Broughton.
      Wayne Szalinski is at it again. But instead of shrinking things, he tries to make a machine that can make things grow. As in the first one, his machine isn't quite accurate. But when he brings Nick & his toddler son Adam to see his invention, the machine unexpectedly starts working. And when Adam comes right up to the machine, he gets zapped along with his stuffed bunny. Now, whenever Adam comes near anything electrical, the electricity causes him to grow. Adam soon starts to grow to the height of over 100 feet. And he is now walking through Las Vegas which he thinks is one big play land.

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Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Image from: Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Despite their dodgy sets and costumes, hokey acting and far-fetched story lines, the classic monster movies of the Forties and Fifties have proved strangely influential to generations of film makers. Maybe it's the potent memories of a key scene that stay with viewers long after the film has finished - take King Kong swatting bi-planes from the side of the Empire State Building or Godzilla creating all sorts of carnage in Tokyo. I suspect that the key behind this movie probably lies in some rose-tinted vision of a giant baby rampaging through the desert as well as the box-office takings from the first movie.

Rick Moranis (remember him?) returns as eccentric scientist Wayne Szalinski, just about hanging onto his sanity and his marriage to Diane (Marcia Strassman) after shrinking his kids and losing them in the back garden. This time, he has been working in a lab trying to reverse the shrinking process he invented. Overseen by shady project manager Dr Hendrickson (John Shea), Wayne accidentally zaps his two-year toddler Adam (Daniel & Joshua Shalikar) who begins to grow in size at an extraordinary rate. Together with his wife, his youngest son Nick (Robert Oliveri) and babysitter Mandy (Keri Russell, debuting), Wayne struggles to get the situation under control, especially when Adam begins to make his way towards Las Vegas...

In essence, what we have here is your classic creature-feature but played for laughs instead of earnest damsels in distress screaming in front of rubber-suited swamp men. Primarily, this should be a special-effects exercise but sadly, this looks dreadfully old-school. "Honey, I Shrunk The Kids" looks better than this limp sequel does, suggesting that the resources and enthusiasm weren't really there. In truth, the movie doesn't pick up until Adam makes his way to Fremont Street amid the glittering casino fronts and panicked tourists but by then, I'd already lost interest. Performances are pretty uninspired, by and large, because the giant baby crashing through walls and trashing Hard Rock Cafes is far too cute and charismatic for anyone else to get close to. Lloyd Bridges has fun as the corporate owner of Wayne's laboratories but everybody else comes across like they're entertaining kids at a party. Which they very well may be, I suppose. There are also fairly large holes in the logic and cohesion of the story, weakening the film further still.

Perhaps if you've got kids of a certain age who are fed up with endless repeats of "Ice Age" and "Shrek" then maybe this will keep them entertained but for most, this simply hasn't dated well like its predecessor. "Honey, I Blew Up The Kid" has one or two funny moments but is generally too reliant on suspect effects and a weak story to carry it through. Moranis was never that great a leading man and films like this weren't likely to change that anytime soon. Harsh, maybe and I'm sure that this film has some supporters but I'm not one of them. It's not as well made, entertaining or exciting as "Honey, I Shrunk The Kids" and now looks as crude and dated as... well, the original creature-features like "Attack Of The 50 Foot Woman" which at least have more charm to them. Sorry but this giant movie is a huge disappointment.


Review by Benjamin Cox from the Internet Movie Database.

 

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