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Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence

Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004) Movie Poster
  •  Japan  •    •  100m  •    •  Directed by: Mamoru Oshii.  •  Starring: Akio Ôtsuka, Atsuko Tanaka, Kôichi Yamadera, Tamio Ôki, Yutaka Nakano, Naoto Takenaka, Gou Aoba, Eisuke Asakura, Robert Axelrod, Laura Bailey, Richard Cansino, Joey D'Auria, Erik Davies.  •  Music by: Kenji Kawai.
        In the year 2032, Batô, a cyborg detective for the anti-terrorist unit Public Security Section 9, investigates the case of a female robot--one created solely for sexual pleasure--who slaughtered her owner.

Trailers:

   Length:  Languages:  Subtitles:
 2:08
 
 
 1:08
 
 
 2:13
 
 
 2:24
 
 1:15
 
 0:31
 
 
 1:21
 
 
 0:50
 
 

Review:

Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
Image from: Kôkaku Kidôtai 2 - Innocence (2004)
It's been an extremely long time since I last laid my eyes on the awesome Ghost in the Shell, and while a sequel and an animated series have spawned a much wider universe, it is up until now that I've finally picked something up to continue where I left off. Written and directed by Mamoru Oshii, Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence just about shows why Japanese Anime remains a cultural force to be reckoned with, boasting fantastic looking visuals, and a deeply engaging storyline that just begs to be watched multiple times in order to appreciate it.

There's something keenly missing from this film though, and that's the presence of Major Kusanagi, who had disappeared at the end of the first film. I suppose it's a tremendous void to fill and thought she was primarily what was interesting as a character, and not to forget her prowess during action sequences, and this sense of loss gets translated wonderfully by Oshii into the character of Batou her cyborg sidekick, who becomes the protagonist we follow in Innocence. Being very much his story and his piece of investigations, together with new partner Togusa, we journey once again into the fictional Japanese city of New Port, which is modelled more after Hong Kong, and what more, Cantonese seems to be the order of the day as well in the finale action sequence.

The main plot here involves the investigations into a series of gruesome murders by what would be illegally made sexbots known as gynoids, which have gone berserk, killing their principals before committing suicide. Made by the company Locus Solus, it brings Batou and Togusa up against the Yakusa as well, which provides for some crazy gun battle sequences, as they get close to the truth behind what these gynoid dolls seem to possess - a ghost - that demands attention to what goes on behind the scenes.

And what is a Ghost in the Shell movie, or a Mamoru Oshii film, without a dabbling in philosophy that almost always boggles the mind and in some ways, bogged down the film unnecessarily. Some dialogue felt forced, especially when the two investigating partners address their testy relationship, with Togusa constantly doubting his own abilities, and trying hard to measure up against Kusanagi in being the perfect partner for Batou. They exchange sayings and philosophies as quoted in famous books, sayings and philosophers, and will probably pique your interest enough to find out more on your own, and their relevance to the context of the film.

In addition, there's the usual talk about hacking, and an incredible sequence involving Batou's routine in an old supermarket involving revenge hacking and some good ol' slow-motion shoot-em-up, while giving us a first glimpse into Batou's oft-touted guardian angel which suggested the return of an iconic GITS character. And any GITS film will not be complete without the mind-numbing portions of the narrative, which involves repeated sequences with a dash of subtle changes that will keep your mind on its toes in deciphering the many layers or reality and fantasy that Inception did best in.


Review by DICK STEEL from the Internet Movie Database.