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The Void

Void, The (2001) Movie Poster
  •  USA / Canada  •    •  93m  •    •  Directed by: Gilbert M. Shilton.  •  Starring: Adrian Paul, Amanda Tapping, Andrew McIlroy, Kirsten Robek, Roger Cross, Michael Rivkin, French Tickner, Malcolm McDowell, Desiree Zurowski, Carlton Watson, Apollonia Vanova, Martin Budny, Ulla Friis.  •  Music by: Ross Vannelli.
      A ruthless CEO holds a whistle blower captive when she tries to stop a top-secret particle acceleration experiment she fears may create a black hole on earth.

Trailers:

   Length:  Languages:  Subtitles:
 1:41
 
 

Review:

Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
Image from: Void, The (2001)
The key to a successful screenplay is creating willing suspension of disbelief. When a screenplay refers to the US Atomic Energy Commission (a government agency which was disestablished over 30 years ago when the US Department of Energy was created) as though it were still with us, that destroys willing suspension of disbelief.

So does the movie's main premise that the bad guys are making black holes by colliding protons and anti-protons at high speed "to turn energy into matter." Collide matter into antimatter and you get an annihilation reaction, and the collective mass of the matter and antimatter becomes energy (apart from the possible creation of some neutrinos, possibly some pair-production events). Just the opposite of what the movie is telling us. (And the movie's premise isn't even as plausible as the far-fetched anxiety over the CERN Large Hadron Collider.)

This is high school physics information we're talking about here! The writers could have taken an undergraduate physics student out for pizza and gotten the true facts for the price of the meal - or just used their good friend Google.

Worse, the dialogue is predictable and the movie just creeps along in that made-for-TV-hack science fiction way. The characters are neither memorable nor very sympathetic. Malcolm McDowell, playing the bad guy-in-chief, is a BORING bad guy with none of the intensity he brought to every other film of his I've seen. Adrian Paul (of The Highlander TV series and other cheap SF movies, Dead Men Can't Dance, among others) is a self-parody as a physicist, complete with a suit made from car seat- cover fabric and glasses swiped from the set of Revenge of the Nerds.

Amanda Tapping (Stargate SG-1) is hemmed in by a horrible script in her role as the helpless heroine whose nuclear physicist dad dies, bringing her into danger. They went all the way back to the 1950s for that hackneyed plot device, the "murdered good scientist's vulnerable daughter who must be rescued by the male lead". And the trip wasn't worth it. They didn't even play it for laughs.

The producers did demonstrate the power of a dead script to subdue every bit of acting ability in the cast of a film. Adrian Paul has had a run of bad luck in this regard - first "Dead Men Can't Dance," then this. I hope some better scripts come his way, because he was very good in the Highlander television series.

Avoid this movie as you would a rabid dog. Walk across the street from it when you see it. Find something else to do besides watch it. It's a worthy bookend to that other Adrian Paul-starring turkey, "Dead Men Can't Dance." They need to be used to keep uneven tables from wobbling at the video store, or their DVDs recycled as targets at a skeet range - maybe used as part of a mobile in a kindergarten art class. Just don't play the things.


Review by vfrickey from the Internet Movie Database.