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Love & Teleportation

Love & Teleportation (2013) Movie Poster
USA  •    •  92m  •    •  Directed by: Troy McGatlin.  •  Starring: Jan Van Sickle, Robin DeMarco, Adair Jameson, Chuma Gault, David Pevsner, Patrick John Hurley, Mars Crain, Kate Parkin, Chuck Church, Holly McGreevy, J.A. Streeter, Matthew Gittelson, Matthew Gittelson.  •  Music by: Michael Cohen.
    Brian Owens was once a prominent professor of quantum mechanics until an accident stripped him of his credentials; he now teaches at a community college. In order to reclaim his stature, he is trying to build the world's first teleportation machine in his garage at night.

Trailers:

   Length:  Languages:  Subtitles:
 2:41
 
 

Review:

Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
Image from: Love & Teleportation (2013)
It's not uncommon to become squeamish in the face of great opportunity. While it raises hope for a brighter future that recognises your sweat, blood, and tears, it can be an incredibly daunting challenge to take on. Success is the reward but it's just as common to find ourselves downtrodden, disheartened, and worst of all, defeated. Suddenly employed as a second rate Community College teacher, Brian Owens finds himself firmly planted in the latter.

Previously a high esteemed quantum physics professor, Brian has lost his credentials, the respect of his peers, and worst of all his reputation. In order to win back his pride, the professor accepts a large loan from a dangerous man to create a functioning teleportation device in his garage but soon finds he has become lonely, obsessive, and dangerously in debt. When Brian meets a woman that is more fascinating than science itself, his life takes an unexpected turn that is filled with romance and grave danger.

Sweet, scientific, and seriously shocking, "Love & Teleportation" manages to hit all the right keys to create one hell of a great science fiction movie. The film has that home grown, homemade atmosphere that you often find in independent films, and it's that personal touch that really makes "Love & Teleportation" a unique experience. There's nothing quite like a good independent film and the efforts that Troy McGatlin and crew went to can be felt throughout the film.

McGatlin did an impressive job of making the script incredibly real. Rather than the characters saying the obvious (or oblivious) over what we'd say in real life, the characters go about their conversations the way real people do; they're witty, they're awkward, they recognise the double meanings in clichéd phrases ("'It's a long story' as in you don't want to say or 'it's a long story' as in it's a long story?"), and the small talk is particularly edgy -' like walking on a tightrope. Additionally, there is a middle aged quirkiness to the characters that's entirely believable and when that quirkiness is mixed with a science fiction theme, the film makes for a unique tugger of the heartstrings.

The main character, Brian Owens, is portrayed by Jan Van Sickle who amazingly manages to maintain the teacher-like tone throughout the film that emphasises the very core of his character -' a culturally narrow-minded genius with a knack for mathematics but very little else. While Van Sickle is semi-unconvincing at the beginning of the film, he gradually becomes more comfortable in his role and gives an air of awkward confidence that grows alongside his bubbly co-star, Robin de Marco, who manages to turn the dark undertone of the film around with her positivity and her seemingly genuine good nature. Van Sickle and de Marco unexpectedly cook up some adorable chemistry despite the huge differences between them and de Marco's ease on screen may have been the spark! As an added bonus, the supporting cast proved to be surprisingly talented. Michelle from next door was played by Adair Jameson and the actress managed to pull off the character arc of the nosy but generous old neighbour while also concealing secret plot lines behind the façade. While she seemed like the generic next door neighbour, Jameson managed to become an enigma with her talent for premonitions and her knowledge of the future, and the actress's innocent approach to the role made her all the more surprising as a side character. As well as Jameson, Chuma Gault, who played the muscle Michael, turned up out of nowhere to steal the scene about fifty minutes into the movie. With a mysterious, cool guy attitude similar to that of Lenny Kravitz in "the Hunger Games", Gault stole the show for the ten minutes he appeared on screen.

Being an acclaimed romantic science fiction film, you've got to expect a few special effects and McGatlin didn't fail to provide. The effects used during the testing of the teleportation machine were simplistic but totally believable, especially during an intense scene towards the end of the film where a person is forced to be teleported. The use of bright, bluish coloured lights and the scene cuts at just the right moments actually worked for the film and reminds us that this isn't just a romance flick -' this is some serious science fiction.

Michael Cohen composed the score for "Love & Teleportation" and he did an excellent job of creating a moment through sound in every scene. The music is largely made up of acoustic songs that wouldn't usually fit a technology based science fiction film but does suit the romantic drama side of things. Overall, the score was lovable and reflected the quirky, middle aged characters and their blossoming romance, and its absence in intense scenes was perfectly intense.

This romantic drama with a science fiction twist, overall, was worth the hour and a half of viewing time. By taking us seamlessly between romantic dialogue and dramatic technological and action scenes, McGatlin has found the perfect balance between two far apart genres. With shocking twists and seemingly real relationship arcs, "Love & Teleportation" takes audiences through time and space to a satisfied end to an unexpected film.

Highlight: the last ten minutes of the film are so dramatic and shocking that it's hard not to make it the highlight of the film. So much happens to the characters in such a short time frame and it's as devastating as it is surprising and relieving. Really, it was the best way to end a film like "Love & Teleportation". So satisfying -' I finished the film with a smile.


Review by Sticky Trigger from the Internet Movie Database.